Pussy Riot Could Face Bondage

Pussy Riot Could Face Bondage

[media-credit name=”wikipedia ” align=”alignleft” width=”300″][/media-credit]Three young women in Russia may spend seven years in prison for “hooliganism” after a flash punk rock performance at a Moscow church that criticized President Vladimir Putin.

Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, Maria Alekhina and Ekaterina Samutsevich, alleged members of the controversial band Pussy Riot, were arrested in March 2012 following the politically-fueled performance at Moscow’s famed Cathedral of Christ the Saviour.

While the three women deny any involvement in the protest (band members cover their faces with balaclavas) even if they took part, the severity of the response by Russian authorities is not justifiable to the peaceful – even if to many, offensive – expression of their political beliefs.

Pussy Riot is a Moscow-based anonymous feminist band that, for the last year and a half, has played unauthorized “flash performances” to protest government policies (watch them in action here).  Pussy Riot’s members use their right to freedom of speech – through music – to shed light on what they perceive to be a corrupt government. In an interview with the Guardian, band member “Garadzha” explains:

“We understood that to achieve change, including in the sphere of women’s rights, it’s not enough to go to Putin and ask for it. This is a rotten, broken system.”

Her bandmate “Tyurya” goes on:

“The culture of protest needs to develop. We have one form, but we need many different kinds.”

They hope that through their music and performances – like the generations of musician activists worldwide who’ve come before them – they can inspire change in their country.

So what was it about their most recent performance that persuaded the government to potentially lock the women up for seven years? The song, “Virgin Mary, Redeem Us of Putin,” calls on the Virgin Mary to become a feminist and banish then Russian President-elect Vladimir Putin. It also criticized the dedication and support shown to Putin by some representatives of the Russian Orthodox Church. The performance was part of wider protests against Putin and unfair elections in Russia.

Read more at Amnesty International 

 

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